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Tam Nguyen  
#1 Posted : Thursday, November 30, 2000 4:00:00 PM(UTC)
Tam Nguyen

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/28/2011(UTC)
Posts: 23

Thân chào quy’ đồng huơng,

Xin quy’ đồng huơng vì tình đồng bào mà nghĩ đê’n hoàn cảnh đa’ng thuơng đang bị hành hạ ở đảo American Samoa của 250-300 công nhân Việt , vơ’i hơn 90% là những thiê’u nữ độ 20 tuổi đi lao động cho hãng Ddại Hàn Daewoosa và bị đô’i xử tàn bạo như : bị thiê’u luơng lâu hơn 6 tha’ng mà mãi vẫn chưa đuơc trả , 38 nguời bị dồn vào ở trong môt apartment 800 square feet kha’ lâu trong thời gian đầu , bị bạc đãi và đô’i xử nguợc ngạo . Và mơ’i đây cô Quyên , môt em ga’i mơ’i hơn 20 tuổi đã bị đa’nh hư môt mă‘t. Xin vào đọc Vietbao Online, Nguoiviet Daily news để biêt thêm chi tiêt và đặc biêt vào RadioBolsa để nghe đuơc tiê’ng kho’c của đồng bào và lời cầu cư’u của họ tại

www.vnradiobolsạcom , click vào 106.3FM 9-12AM ngày Thursday và Friday

Minh Phuợng và Việt Dzũng đã tuờng thuật môt buổi no’i chuyện trưc tiêp rât cảm động và đầy đủ vơ’i Huy Lê, môt tình nguyện viên đầy lòng nhân a’i đã qua Samoa Island để thông dịch và bênh vực cho đồng bào, cũng như vơ’i môt nam , môt nữ công nhân , và sau cùng là tiêp chuyện vơ’i cô Quyên , nguời con gai’i gan dạ đã đư’ng lên no’i lên tiê’ng no’i của mình và đã bị bọn bât nhân đa’nh hỏng môt mă‘t !!
Chiều nay tôi mơ’i mơ’i viê’t xong la’ thơ này để nhờ đồng bào mình chuyển tơ’i ca’c cơ quan hay viên chư’c co’ thẩm quyền và biê’t chỗ nhờ can thiệp để họ co’ thể giu’p đồng bào mình ở Samoa .
Tôi đã post thơ này lên mâ’y website ,bây giờ nhờ moi nguời ở đây ky’ tên , gởi thư đi gìum.
Ca’m ơn quy’ đồng huơng

Trân trọng,
Tâm Nguyên



Bản 1 : để gởi dân biểu district mình cư ngụ như Christopher Cox , Ed Royce, Dana Rohrabacher, ở Cali , Tom Davis , Virginia v.v…
Email ađresses và địa chỉ của họ là :

Rep. Tom Davis
Constituent Service Offices:
Annandale District Office
7018 Evergreen Court
Annandale, VA 22003
Phone: (703) 916-9610
Fax: (703) 916-9617
tom.davis@mail.housẹgov
(When sending an e-mail, please include your home mailing ađress.)

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher
District Office
101 Main Street, Suite 3C
Huntington Beach, CA 92648
(714) 960-6483
Constituents can e-mail the Congressman at Dana@mail.housẹgov (Dana Rohrabacher)

Rep. Ed Royce
305 N. Harbor Blvd., Suite 300
Fullerton, CA 92832
(714) 992-8081; (562) 220-2411
http://www.housẹgov/royce/ ( xin vào webpage này của d/b Ed Royce để gởi email )


+ Nê’u không gỏi bằng email đuơc , thì xin print ra giâ’y , bỏ phong bì và gởi đê’n địa chỉ của họ



The Honorable ….
Washington , D.C.

December 1st, 2000

Dear Congressman…/Congresswoman…


I am writing this letter to you to ask for help in this immensely cruel, horrible abuse of workers and human labor.
Recently, a group of 250 workers from Vietnam have come to the island of Amrican Somoa on a contract to work in a garment sweatshop named Daewoosa, a Korean companỵ There have been so much abuses and maltreatment from the owner-president and managing staff of that company toward the workers since the last 9 months. There has been a strike—or a form of strike—in which the workers tried to request the management to resolve some of the abuses and incredible exploitation as well as maltreatment of the workers , but the management refused to do anything. On Tuesday 11/28/00, the Korean owner of that sweat shop Kil Soo Lee even gave the Samoan supervisor the instruction to beat up the Vietnamese workers if there is a problem. And if deaths occurred, Lee would take responsibilitỵ On hearing that, the supervisor and a few other Somoans started their abuse right away-- just minutes after getting that instruction from the Korean-- when a young Vietnamese woman tried to explain something to the Samoan supervisor, but he interpreted it as “resisting order” and started hitting her hard with a metal bar. Other Vietnamese tried to come in to calm things down , but other Somoans jumped in and attacked the Vietnamesẹ This resulted in something reporters called a “riot”. The consequence of the attack of the Samoans, with the instruction of the Korean was there had been 11 Vietnamese hospitalized. Quyen, the young woman had been beaten so cruelly in the eyes that now she has lost one eyẹ One Vietnamese young man had had many broken bones and bad injury in the mouth areạ
Having learned of the recent tension in the American Samoa, a Vietnamese American from N. Carolina, Huy Le flew out to there to help with translation to try to resolve some of the differencen because the Vietnamese workers from Vietnam speak very little or no English at all. But Huy’s efffort has come to no prevail. Even Huy is now speaking of the danger of being beaten himself. Here are some facts that Huy collected , besides the films and video tapes he has made of the incidents:
1. The Vietnamese did not get paid for some months.
2. In the starting period, 38 were salmoned in a 800 square feet apartment.
3. Constant insults and abuses from the management.
4. Four Viet women started preliminary strikes.
5. Korean Lee got restrain order from Samoa court not to “contact” the workers.
6. Lieutenant Governor of Samoa sided with Leẹ
7. Lee was ordered to pay $213,000 in backpay to the Viet workers, but we do not know if this has materialized.

Congressman…/Congressman…

I enclose here an article from a reporter for your information and a letter from Ms. Heather Magaret, a lady who is helping out in the casẹ I believe these facts have proved that Daewoosa had practiced its business with illegal and ill-intentioned measures, nakedly robbed and cheated the workers of their income, abused and cruelly treated the Viet workers. I also believe that the laws of this nation forbid such practice and treatment
of human labor, human beings, and the conscience in each of us will not allow such abuse and injusticẹ Therefore, I am asking you to help amidst this inhumanity and illegal practice of business to stop this horrible situation.

As a constituent in your district, I hereby thank you deeply for your help.

Truly yours,


Name:
Ađress:
++++

Hello All,

Sometime ago I sent out a message appealing for help in finding a Vietnamese interpreter for some 300 Vietnamese women in Samoa for a hearing on the labor rights casẹ Here is a response from Ms. Heather Magaret, the lady who was helping the women in this casẹ Íve
forwarded the message to you for more information on the matter. Again, if you can help in any way you can, you can still contact Ms. Magaret at the phone and e-mail ađress at the bottom of this messagẹ Thank you for your interest in this matter.

Lan Quoc Nguyen
==================================

Wow! Everyonés responses have been great. Just a month ago we were feeling downhearted to be on this tiny island in the miđle of the ocean where there is no one to help in this unpopular casẹ I made just a few inquiries to activist groups through the internet and Nikki Bas
of sweatshopwatch.org forwarded our situation along. Things were quiet for a few days then a response, and another and another - everyone who forwarded the news along made a differencẹ We are no longer alonẹ In the past week I have heard from people willing to come help, others with legal advice,offers of telephone support, members of the mass media interested in providing ađitional coverage of the situation. It is great to realize how many people carẹMany of you have questions about the case, and Íd like to share with you what is going on, as well as let you know what our needs are at this timẹThe local newspaper has covered the story, with its own local flavor, and you can read past issues online at www.samoanews.com.Daewoosa began sewing here in March 1999. Most of the members of the corporation are Korean, with a few Samoan members - meeting the American Samoa Government requirement that all businesses are owned, at least in part, by American Samoans. Daewoosa contracted with "management" companies to provide laborers brought in from Vietnam. As a US Territory, garments sewn here carry a "made in USA" label. The minimum wage here is $2.52 USD/hour. What I had heard, by way of one of the women who is now dead, was that families in Vietnam pay $5-7,000.00 USD to get one of their women a job herẹ They have high hopes that the promised wages will be sent back home to allow for the betterment of the entire familỵ However when they got here, the actual wage was much less than what they had been promised.

Later that year four courageous women went on strike, seeking their contracted for wages. They were jailed and almost sent back to Vietnam. The Department of Labor arranged a settlement in which these four were to be paid.

At the end of 1999 the workers were still not being paid. Now it was nine of them who stood together and requested they be paid, their employer made arrangements to have the deported.

Since that time the others came together (about 100 of the 300) and have been designated as a legal "class" for the suit. Throughout this year they have been tageted for harrassment, suspended from work, at times kept in the compound, continually not paid, gone hungry with inadequate meals - for which they have been required to pay, even though their contract promised them food and housing. Theýve had their passports and ID cards taken away from them. Their families in Vietnam have been harrassed for having dissident daughters.

The company itself seems to be not functioning well, there was nothing for the women to sew for almost two months - during which time they were to stay in the compound and were not paid. They became increasingly bold and began to go out during the days looking for work. They need to send money home for their families to pay off the enormous debts incurred in getting them here, but they are not legally allowed to work except for their sponsor/employer. There are warnings in the paper about it being a violation of immigration law to help these women by allowing them to work.

A few weeks ago Daewoosa went back to "full time production" and all workers were to be sewing full time again. However, this lasted less than a week, the company seems to be rationing fabric to keep the women busy, but they are still laid off for afternoons from time to time - and out in the community looking for ođ-jobs.

The court is called on in this case to restore them their rights of freedom of speech, movement and association, to have them paid a fair and legal wage, to have the stated benefits of their contracts
fulfilled, to allow them due process before the Immigration Board, and to free them and their families from harrassment and discrimination for seeking these basic rights.

Very few of the women speak English, and none of them are near
proficient enough to communicate easily beyond basic exchanges. There was one woman who had not only the language skills, but also the courage to organize the women and take their case to the legal system. She died during a Sunday afternoon outing in which 30 women went to a local swimming areạ She and a friend were walking on a ledge well above the water when a huge, unexpected wave crashed and these two were thrown over the edge and dissappeared. There had been an earthquake near Fiji a short while before which could explain the unusal wave, and these two just happened to be near the water when it hit. The others, I have heard, were out of the water and away from the shore getting ready to leave or else many more would have been lost. There was no "foul play" involved in her death.

The hearing in Friday will be reviewing with the judge some printed contracts of employment for the women. The key testimony will come from the Korean speaking employer. There are many Korean people here who speak English well, and we had not anticipated a need for an
interpreter, however the past week left the case without any one willing to be involved in a case against the men of Daewoosạ We were making urgent arrangements to bring someone in from off-island, and at last someone agreed and is able to help.For this Friday the hearing is covered.

The trial in January is only two days (18 and 19), and we certainly will need to have someone able to interpret for these two days in the court. However I am concerned that if we do not continue to support and encourage these women, provide them with timely feedback about their situation and the progress of the case, and provide education on human rights and labor rights for them to really understand what they are entitled to that the harrassment and silence will take its toll, and they will lose hope in what they set out to accomplish. It is important not only that these women are provided justice, but American Samoa needs to learn for itself about human rights and labor. Our "distant to all" location had kept it free from these issues for a long time (unlike Saipan's situation), but as attention focuses in one part of the world the sweatshops will pack up and try to do their business elsewherẹ I have heard there are other garment factories trying to go into
operation herẹ If Daewoosa is handled well we may save this island from alot of suffering.

Ím excited to hear of all the interest. We will be following up to those who have offered leads and advicẹ We may need your help in the future if it becomes important to demonstrate to the local isolated legal system that eyes are on them and care about the decisions they makẹ

Thank You all very much.
Heather Margaret
Heather.Margaret@alumnaẹbrynmawr.edu



PACIFIC ISLANDS REPORT

VIETNAMESE WORKER LOSES EYE IN DAEWOOSA SAMOA MELEE

By Fili Sagapolutele

PAGO PAGO, American Samoa (November 29, 2000 - PIDP/CPIS)---Eleven Vietnamese workers were injured, including a woman who lost her left eye, after a melee erupted between Samoan and Vietnamese workers at the Daewoosa Samoa garment factory on Tuesdaỵ

And several Vietnamese workers, in a sworn statement to police, accused the companýs owner-president, Mr. Kil Soo Lee, of instigating the meleẹ

Police are not commenting on the case except to say that an investigation is under way and no arrests have been madẹ

Ms. Quyen, who lost her eye, has also been identified as being at the center of a disagreement with a Samoan supervisor that allegedly prompted the battle between the two groups.

Vietnamese workers claimed to have seen the supervisor, identified in affidavits as Mr. Nùuuli, get physically rough with Ms. Quyen, who has been described as "tiny" when standing next to her supervisor.

Vietnamese workers are claiming that they moved in towards Mr. Nùuuli in an effort to separate Ms. Quyen from him and to shield her from harm.

In immediate response to the group of Vietnamese workers allegedly rushing Mr. Nùuuli, many of the Samoan workers allegedly rushed the Vietnamese workers on the assumption that he was being attacked by the foreign workers.

After the situation quieted down, it was discovered that Ms. Quyen suffered a severe eye injurỵ Her left eyés corona and retina had been serious damaged. Later, medical personnel determined that the eye could not be saved and it was completely removed by surgerỵ

Ms. Quyen has since alleged that another Samoan worker struck her with "something" on the left side of her facẹ That "something" remains unidentified.

Daewoosa employee attorneys Virginia Sudbury and Christa Lin said that their clients now "are all terrified of going back to the Daewoosa factorỵ"

Sudbury described many of the Vietnamese workers as being hurt, with cuts and bruises. They were all treated and released from the hospital except for Ms. Quyen, who is still hospitalized.

"Christa and I are very upset over this case," Sudbury said.

She believes that this is just another example of Daewoosás continuing efforts to intimidate its foreign workers because of their class action suit against the companỵ

"We don't know if this was planned or who is at fault here but what we do know is that a number of workers have been assaulted, with one extremely badly hurt," she said.

"Christa and I hope that charges will be filed against anyone who caused these serious injuries to the Vietnamese workers," she continued.

Vietnamese workers normally are housed at Daewoosa Samoás dormitories but most of them now are staying with local families as a result of the incident.

Several Vietnamese workers in statements taken by police, with the help of a translator, accused Mr. Lee of instigating the meleẹ

According to the workers statements, Mr. Lee allegedly told his floor supervisor, Mr. Nùuuli, "to beat anybody that won't listen and that if anybody dies, I will be responsible for that."

In a notarized and typed statement filed in court, Daewoosa worker Hang Thu Ngo reported seeing his Samoan co-workers "armed with sticks and small scissors repeatedly stab and beat the Vietnamese workers" and also saw "many Vietnamese workers who were bleeding from the mouths and eyes."

Another worker, 28-year old Trinh Thi Hao, reported that "all the Samoan workers already have sticks. They are readỵ So as a result, Samoans came to beat us up. As I was standing up, watch, one of the Samoan workers pulled my hair out on the ground and hurt mẹ Then everybody else tried to pull me out. The people hit mẹ I remember their faces but I don't know their names. My chest is hurting bad now."

One 32-year-old Vietnamese worker said, "My friends and I came to prevent them from fighting. But I didn't know why there were many Samoan people rushing out with sticks in their hands to fight against Vietnamese workers. I came to my room to take my camera for taking photographs but Samoan people prevented me from it."

Daewoosa Samoás manager, Virginia Solìai, denied the allegations against Mr. Leẹ According to Solìai, the floor supervisor found two workers lying on a sewing table in the factorỵ The two workers said they were waiting for materials.

Solíai said when the floor supervisor informed them to go and pick up the materials, Ms. Quyen started yelling back at him but still would not return to work.

The floor supervisor complained to the Vietnamese manager about the problem but no attempts were made to correct it. The matter was then taken to Mr. Shung, the production manager.

Explaining the companýs policies, Solíai said anyone caught sitting around on the job or sleeping, whether he or she is Samoan or Vietnamese, is told to go homẹ

Mr. Shung ordered that the woman, or anyone else not working, to get out of the factory and go homẹ But as the floor supervisor was taking Miss Quyen's hand to lead her out of the factory, she allegedly threw the first punch and allegedly slapped the floor supervisor.

The ironing department workers saw the Vietnamese workers run towards the floor supervisor with "weapons" such as scissors and cutters to attack him.

Allegedly, this resulted in a laceration on the floor supervisor's facẹ

As recalled by Solìai, who was not in the area, the Samoans working in the packing department saw the attack on the floor supervisor, who was now on the floor, and "came fighting with their hands."

"These Samoans work in the packing department and they don't use any cutters or scissors. They used their hands to help defend the floor supervisor against the attack," Solìai explained.

Solìai said the Samoan workers do not use any sharp items in their working areas and believes it was the hands that caused the injuries.

Regarding the allegations that Mr. Lee ordered the beating, Solìai said Mr. Lee was not even in the vicinity when it happened. She said she and Mr. Lee were outside of the factory at the timẹ

Currently, Daewoosa has about 250 foreign workers and fewer than 50 local workers.

Daewoosa Samoa has been marred with financial problems, including not paying its foreign workers. The company also has been cited by the ỤS. Department of Labor for violating labor laws.

A meeting between representatives of the territorial government, Daewoosa Samoa and attorney for the Vietnamese workers is scheduled for sometime later this week.

A court order is pending that prohibits Daewoosa Samoa from deporting any Vietnamese workers without court approval or due process.




Kê’ thư tôi viêt là thơ kèm của bà Heather Magaret ,duơ’i ca’i note của luât. sư NQLân, Bà là môt nguời đã vì thuơng hoàn cảnh của ng` mình bên Samoa mà sang đo’ giu’p đỡ trong ca’c vâ’n đề luật pha’p. (nên copy và paste để gởi đi cùng vơ’i bài viêt của Pacific Islands Report ở duơ’i cùng để nguời mình gởi thư đê’n hiểu nội vụ )




Bản 2 : để gởi cho bà Alexis M. Herman ở Dept of Labor (không co’emailađress, xin in ra ,da’n tem gơ’i đi

Ms. Alexis M. Herman
Secretary of Labor
ỤS. Department of Labor
200 Constitution Avẹ, NW
Washington, D.C.20210
Dec 1st, 2000

Dear Ms. Secretary of Labor,

I am writing this letter to you to ask for help in this immensely cruel, horrible abuse of workers and human labor.
Recently, a group of 250 workers from Vietnam have come to the island of Amrican Somoa on a contract to work in a garment sweatshop named Daewoosa, a Korean companỵ There have been so much abuses and maltreatment from the owner-president and managing staff of that company toward the workers since the last 9 months. There has been a strike—or a form of strike—in which the workers tried to request the management to resolve some of the abuses and incredible exploitation as well as maltreatment of the workers , but the management refused to do anything. On Tuesday 11/28/00, the Korean owner of that sweat shop Kil Soo Lee even gave the Samoan supervisor the instruction to beat up the Vietnamese workers if there is a problem. And if deaths occurred, Lee would take responsibilitỵ On hearing that, the supervisor and a few other Somoans started their abuse right away-- just minutes after getting that instruction from the Korean-- when a young Vietnamese woman tried to explain something to the Samoan supervisor, but he interpreted it as “resisting order” and started hitting her hard with a metal bar. Other Vietnamese tried to come in to calm things down , but other Somoans jumped in and attacked the Vietnamesẹ This resulted in something reporters called a “riot”. The consequence of the attack of the Samoans, with the instruction of the Korean was there had been 11 Vietnamese hospitalized. Quyen, the young woman had been beaten so cruelly in the eyes that now she has lost one eyẹ One Vietnamese young man had had many broken bones and bad injury in the mouth areạ
Having learned of the recent tension in the American Samoa, a Vietnamese American from N. Carolina, Huy Le flew out to there to help with translation to try to resolve some of the differencen because the Vietnamese workers from Vietnam speak very little or no English at all. But Huy’s efffort has come to no prevail. Even Huy is now speaking of the danger of being beaten himself. Here are some facts that Huy collected , besides the films and video tapes he has made of the incidents:
1. The Vietnamese did not get paid for some months.
2. In the starting period, 38 were salmoned in a 800 square feet apartment.
3. Constant insults and abuses from the management.
4. Four Viet women started preliminary strikes.
5. Korean Lee got restrain order from Samoa court not to “contact” the workers.
6. Lieutenant Governor of Samoa sided with Leẹ
7. Lee was ordered to pay $213,000 in backpay to the Viet workers, but we do not know if this has materialized.

Madam,
I enclose here an article from a reporter for your information and a letter from Ms. Heather Magaret, a lady who is helping out in the casẹ I believe these facts have proved that Daewoosa had practiced its business with illegal and ill-intentioned measures, nakedly robbed and cheated the workers of their income, abused and cruelly treated the Viet workers. I also believe that the laws of this nation forbid such practice and treatment
of human labor, human beings, and the conscience in each of us will not allow such abuse and injusticẹ Therefore, I am asking you to help amidst this inhumanity and illegal practice of business to stop this horrible situation.

Thank you deeply for your concern and intervention in this matter.

Truly yours,

Name:
Ađress:

++++


Hello All,

Sometime ago I sent out a message appealing for help in finding a Vietnamese interpreter for some 300 Vietnamese women in Samoa for a hearing on the labor rights casẹ Here is a response from Ms. Heather Magaret, the lady who was helping the women in this casẹ Íve
forwarded the message to you for more information on the matter. Again, if you can help in any way you can, you can still contact Ms. Magaret at the phone and e-mail ađress at the bottom of this messagẹ Thank you for your interest in this matter.

Lan Quoc Nguyen
==================================

Wow! Everyonés responses have been great. Just a month ago we were feeling downhearted to be on this tiny island in the miđle of the ocean where there is no one to help in this unpopular casẹ I made just a few inquiries to activist groups through the internet and Nikki Bas
of sweatshopwatch.org forwarded our situation along. Things were quiet for a few days then a response, and another and another - everyone who forwarded the news along made a differencẹ We are no longer alonẹ In the past week I have heard from people willing to come help, others with legal advice,offers of telephone support, members of the mass media interested in providing ađitional coverage of the situation. It is great to realize how many people carẹMany of you have questions about the case, and Íd like to share with you what is going on, as well as let you know what our needs are at this timẹThe local newspaper has covered the story, with its own local flavor, and you can read past issues online at www.samoanews.com.Daewoosa began sewing here in March 1999. Most of the members of the corporation are Korean, with a few Samoan members - meeting the American Samoa Government requirement that all businesses are owned, at least in part, by American Samoans. Daewoosa contracted with "management" companies to provide laborers brought in from Vietnam. As a US Territory, garments sewn here carry a "made in USA" label. The minimum wage here is $2.52 USD/hour. What I had heard, by way of one of the women who is now dead, was that families in Vietnam pay $5-7,000.00 USD to get one of their women a job herẹ They have high hopes that the promised wages will be sent back home to allow for the betterment of the entire familỵ However when they got here, the actual wage was much less than what they had been promised.

Later that year four courageous women went on strike, seeking their contracted for wages. They were jailed and almost sent back to Vietnam. The Department of Labor arranged a settlement in which these four were to be paid.

At the end of 1999 the workers were still not being paid. Now it was nine of them who stood together and requested they be paid, their employer made arrangements to have the deported.

Since that time the others came together (about 100 of the 300) and have been designated as a legal "class" for the suit. Throughout this year they have been tageted for harrassment, suspended from work, at times kept in the compound, continually not paid, gone hungry with inadequate meals - for which they have been required to pay, even though their contract promised them food and housing. Theýve had their passports and ID cards taken away from them. Their families in Vietnam have been harrassed for having dissident daughters.

The company itself seems to be not functioning well, there was nothing for the women to sew for almost two months - during which time they were to stay in the compound and were not paid. They became increasingly bold and began to go out during the days looking for work. They need to send money home for their families to pay off the enormous debts incurred in getting them here, but they are not legally allowed to work except for their sponsor/employer. There are warnings in the paper about it being a violation of immigration law to help these women by allowing them to work.

A few weeks ago Daewoosa went back to "full time production" and all workers were to be sewing full time again. However, this lasted less than a week, the company seems to be rationing fabric to keep the women busy, but they are still laid off for afternoons from time to time - and out in the community looking for ođ-jobs.

The court is called on in this case to restore them their rights of freedom of speech, movement and association, to have them paid a fair and legal wage, to have the stated benefits of their contracts
fulfilled, to allow them due process before the Immigration Board, and to free them and their families from harrassment and discrimination for seeking these basic rights.

Very few of the women speak English, and none of them are near
proficient enough to communicate easily beyond basic exchanges. There was one woman who had not only the language skills, but also the courage to organize the women and take their case to the legal system. She died during a Sunday afternoon outing in which 30 women went to a local swimming areạ She and a friend were walking on a ledge well above the water when a huge, unexpected wave crashed and these two were thrown over the edge and dissappeared. There had been an earthquake near Fiji a short while before which could explain the unusal wave, and these two just happened to be near the water when it hit. The others, I have heard, were out of the water and away from the shore getting ready to leave or else many more would have been lost. There was no "foul play" involved in her death.

The hearing in Friday will be reviewing with the judge some printed contracts of employment for the women. The key testimony will come from the Korean speaking employer. There are many Korean people here who speak English well, and we had not anticipated a need for an
interpreter, however the past week left the case without any one willing to be involved in a case against the men of Daewoosạ We were making urgent arrangements to bring someone in from off-island, and at last someone agreed and is able to help.For this Friday the hearing is covered.

The trial in January is only two days (18 and 19), and we certainly will need to have someone able to interpret for these two days in the court. However I am concerned that if we do not continue to support and encourage these women, provide them with timely feedback about their situation and the progress of the case, and provide education on human rights and labor rights for them to really understand what they are entitled to that the harrassment and silence will take its toll, and they will lose hope in what they set out to accomplish. It is important not only that these women are provided justice, but American Samoa needs to learn for itself about human rights and labor. Our "distant to all" location had kept it free from these issues for a long time (unlike Saipan's situation), but as attention focuses in one part of the world the sweatshops will pack up and try to do their business elsewherẹ I have heard there are other garment factories trying to go into
operation herẹ If Daewoosa is handled well we may save this island from alot of suffering.

Ím excited to hear of all the interest. We will be following up to those who have offered leads and advicẹ We may need your help in the future if it becomes important to demonstrate to the local isolated legal system that eyes are on them and care about the decisions they makẹ

Thank You all very much.
Heather Margaret
Heather.Margaret@alumnaẹbrynmawr.edu



PACIFIC ISLANDS REPORT

VIETNAMESE WORKER LOSES EYE IN DAEWOOSA SAMOA MELEE

By Fili Sagapolutele

PAGO PAGO, American Samoa (November 29, 2000 - PIDP/CPIS)---Eleven Vietnamese workers were injured, including a woman who lost her left eye, after a melee erupted between Samoan and Vietnamese workers at the Daewoosa Samoa garment factory on Tuesdaỵ

And several Vietnamese workers, in a sworn statement to police, accused the companýs owner-president, Mr. Kil Soo Lee, of instigating the meleẹ

Police are not commenting on the case except to say that an investigation is under way and no arrests have been madẹ

Ms. Quyen, who lost her eye, has also been identified as being at the center of a disagreement with a Samoan supervisor that allegedly prompted the battle between the two groups.

Vietnamese workers claimed to have seen the supervisor, identified in affidavits as Mr. Nùuuli, get physically rough with Ms. Quyen, who has been described as "tiny" when standing next to her supervisor.

Vietnamese workers are claiming that they moved in towards Mr. Nùuuli in an effort to separate Ms. Quyen from him and to shield her from harm.

In immediate response to the group of Vietnamese workers allegedly rushing Mr. Nùuuli, many of the Samoan workers allegedly rushed the Vietnamese workers on the assumption that he was being attacked by the foreign workers.

After the situation quieted down, it was discovered that Ms. Quyen suffered a severe eye injurỵ Her left eyés corona and retina had been serious damaged. Later, medical personnel determined that the eye could not be saved and it was completely removed by surgerỵ

Ms. Quyen has since alleged that another Samoan worker struck her with "something" on the left side of her facẹ That "something" remains unidentified.

Daewoosa employee attorneys Virginia Sudbury and Christa Lin said that their clients now "are all terrified of going back to the Daewoosa factorỵ"

Sudbury described many of the Vietnamese workers as being hurt, with cuts and bruises. They were all treated and released from the hospital except for Ms. Quyen, who is still hospitalized.

"Christa and I are very upset over this case," Sudbury said.

She believes that this is just another example of Daewoosás continuing efforts to intimidate its foreign workers because of their class action suit against the companỵ

"We don't know if this was planned or who is at fault here but what we do know is that a number of workers have been assaulted, with one extremely badly hurt," she said.

"Christa and I hope that charges will be filed against anyone who caused these serious injuries to the Vietnamese workers," she continued.

Vietnamese workers normally are housed at Daewoosa Samoás dormitories but most of them now are staying with local families as a result of the incident.

Several Vietnamese workers in statements taken by police, with the help of a translator, accused Mr. Lee of instigating the meleẹ

According to the workers statements, Mr. Lee allegedly told his floor supervisor, Mr. Nùuuli, "to beat anybody that won't listen and that if anybody dies, I will be responsible for that."

In a notarized and typed statement filed in court, Daewoosa worker Hang Thu Ngo reported seeing his Samoan co-workers "armed with sticks and small scissors repeatedly stab and beat the Vietnamese workers" and also saw "many Vietnamese workers who were bleeding from the mouths and eyes."

Another worker, 28-year old Trinh Thi Hao, reported that "all the Samoan workers already have sticks. They are readỵ So as a result, Samoans came to beat us up. As I was standing up, watch, one of the Samoan workers pulled my hair out on the ground and hurt mẹ Then everybody else tried to pull me out. The people hit mẹ I remember their faces but I don't know their names. My chest is hurting bad now."

One 32-year-old Vietnamese worker said, "My friends and I came to prevent them from fighting. But I didn't know why there were many Samoan people rushing out with sticks in their hands to fight against Vietnamese workers. I came to my room to take my camera for taking photographs but Samoan people prevented me from it."

Daewoosa Samoás manager, Virginia Solìai, denied the allegations against Mr. Leẹ According to Solìai, the floor supervisor found two workers lying on a sewing table in the factorỵ The two workers said they were waiting for materials.

Solíai said when the floor supervisor informed them to go and pick up the materials, Ms. Quyen started yelling back at him but still would not return to work.

The floor supervisor complained to the Vietnamese manager about the problem but no attempts were made to correct it. The matter was then taken to Mr. Shung, the production manager.

Explaining the companýs policies, Solíai said anyone caught sitting around on the job or sleeping, whether he or she is Samoan or Vietnamese, is told to go homẹ

Mr. Shung ordered that the woman, or anyone else not working, to get out of the factory and go homẹ But as the floor supervisor was taking Miss Quyen's hand to lead her out of the factory, she allegedly threw the first punch and allegedly slapped the floor supervisor.

The ironing department workers saw the Vietnamese workers run towards the floor supervisor with "weapons" such as scissors and cutters to attack him.

Allegedly, this resulted in a laceration on the floor supervisor's facẹ

As recalled by Solìai, who was not in the area, the Samoans working in the packing department saw the attack on the floor supervisor, who was now on the floor, and "came fighting with their hands."

"These Samoans work in the packing department and they don't use any cutters or scissors. They used their hands to help defend the floor supervisor against the attack," Solìai explained.

Solìai said the Samoan workers do not use any sharp items in their working areas and believes it was the hands that caused the injuries.

Regarding the allegations that Mr. Lee ordered the beating, Solìai said Mr. Lee was not even in the vicinity when it happened. She said she and Mr. Lee were outside of the factory at the timẹ

Currently, Daewoosa has about 250 foreign workers and fewer than 50 local workers.

Daewoosa Samoa has been marred with financial problems, including not paying its foreign workers. The company also has been cited by the ỤS. Department of Labor for violating labor laws.

A meeting between representatives of the territorial government, Daewoosa Samoa and attorney for the Vietnamese workers is scheduled for sometime later this week.

A court order is pending that prohibits Daewoosa Samoa from deporting any Vietnamese workers without court approval or due process.




Ddây là thơ kèm của bà Heather Magaret , duơ’i ca’i note của luât. sư NQLân, Bà là môt nguời đã vì thuơng hoàn cảnh của ng` mình bên Samoa mà sang đo’ giu’p đỡ trong ca’c vâ’n đề luật pha’p. (nên copy và paste để gởi đi cùng vơ’i bài viêt của Pacific Islands Report ở duơ’i cùng để nguời mình gởi thư đê’n hiểu nội vụ )



Bản 3 : để gởi cho AFL-CIO ( Liên hiệp Ddại biểu Ca’c tổ chư’c Lao Ddông Công nghiệp).

AFL-CIO
815 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006
Phone: (202) 637-5000
Fax: (202) 637-5058
E-Mail: feedback@aflciọorg


AFL-CIO
Washington, DC 20006

Dec 1st, 2000

Dear Sirs/Madams,
I am writing this letter to you to ask for help in this immensely cruel, horrible abuse of workers and human labor.
Recently, a group of 250 workers from Vietnam have come to the island of Amrican Somoa on a contract to work in a garment sweatshop named Daewoosa, a Korean companỵ There have been so much abuses and maltreatment from the owner-president and managing staff of that company toward the workers since the last 9 months. There has been a strike—or a form of strike—in which the workers tried to request the management to resolve some of the abuses and incredible exploitation as well as maltreatment of the workers , but the management refused to do anything. On Tuesday 11/28/00, the Korean owner of that sweat shop Kil Soo Lee even gave the Samoan supervisor the instruction to beat up the Vietnamese workers if there is a problem. And if deaths occurred, Lee would take responsibilitỵ On hearing that, the supervisor and a few other Somoans started their abuse right away-- just minutes after getting that instruction from the Korean-- when a young Vietnamese woman tried to explain something to the Samoan supervisor, but he interpreted it as “resisting order” and started hitting her hard with metal bar. Other Vietnamese tried to come in to calm things down , but other Somoans jumped in and attacked the Vietnamesẹ This resulted in something reporters called a “riot”. The consequence of the attack of the Samoans, with the instruction of the Korean was there had been 11 Vietnamese hospitalized. Quyen, the young woman had been beaten so cruelly in the eyes that now she has lost one eyẹ One Vietnamese young man had had many broken bones and bad injury in the mouth areạ
Having learned of the recent tension in the American Samoa, a Vietnamese America from N. Carolina, Huy Le flew out to there to help with translation to try to resolve some of the differencen because the Vietnamese workers from Vietnam speak very little or no English at all. But Huy’s efffort has come to no prevail. Even Huy is now speaking of the danger of being beaten himself. Here are some facts that Huy collected , besides the films and video tapes he has made of the incidents:
1. The Vietnamese did not get paid for some months.
2. In the starting period, 38 were salmoned in a 800 square feet apartment.
3. Constant insults and abuses from the management.
4. Four Viet women started preliminary strikes.
5. Korean Lee got restrain order from Samoa court not to “contact” the workers.
6. Lieutenant Governor of Samoa sided with Leẹ
7. Lee was ordered to pay $213,000 in backpay to the Viet workers, but we do not know if this has materialized.

Sirs/Madams,
I enclose here an article from a reporter for your information and a letter from Ms. Heather Magaret, a lady who is helping out in the casẹ I believe these facts have proved that Daewoosa had practiced its business with illegal and ill-intentioned measures, nakedly robbed and cheated the workers of their income, abused and cruelly treated the Viet workers. I also believe that the laws of this nation forbid such practice and treatment
of human labor, human beings, and the conscience in each of us will not allow such abuse and injusticẹ Therefore, I am asking you to help amidst this inhumanity and illegal practice of business to stop this horrible situation.

Thank you deeply for your concern and intervention in this matter.

Truly yours,


Name:
Ađress:
++++


Hello All,

Sometime ago I sent out a message appealing for help in finding a Vietnamese interpreter for some 300 Vietnamese women in Samoa for a hearing on the labor rights casẹ Here is a response from Ms. Heather Magaret, the lady who was helping the women in this casẹ Íve
forwarded the message to you for more information on the matter. Again, if you can help in any way you can, you can still contact Ms. Magaret at the phone and e-mail ađress at the bottom of this messagẹ Thank you for your interest in this matter.

Lan Quoc Nguyen
==================================

Wow! Everyonés responses have been great. Just a month ago we were feeling downhearted to be on this tiny island in the miđle of the ocean where there is no one to help in this unpopular casẹ I made just a few inquiries to activist groups through the internet and Nikki Bas
of sweatshopwatch.org forwarded our situation along. Things were quiet for a few days then a response, and another and another - everyone who forwarded the news along made a differencẹ We are no longer alonẹ In the past week I have heard from people willing to come help, others with legal advice,offers of telephone support, members of the mass media interested in providing ađitional coverage of the situation. It is great to realize how many people carẹMany of you have questions about the case, and Íd like to share with you what is going on, as well as let you know what our needs are at this timẹThe local newspaper has covered the story, with its own local flavor, and you can read past issues online at www.samoanews.com.Daewoosa began sewing here in March 1999. Most of the members of the corporation are Korean, with a few Samoan members - meeting the American Samoa Government requirement that all businesses are owned, at least in part, by American Samoans. Daewoosa contracted with "management" companies to provide laborers brought in from Vietnam. As a US Territory, garments sewn here carry a "made in USA" label. The minimum wage here is $2.52 USD/hour. What I had heard, by way of one of the women who is now dead, was that families in Vietnam pay $5-7,000.00 USD to get one of their women a job herẹ They have high hopes that the promised wages will be sent back home to allow for the betterment of the entire familỵ However when they got here, the actual wage was much less than what they had been promised.

Later that year four courageous women went on strike, seeking their contracted for wages. They were jailed and almost sent back to Vietnam. The Department of Labor arranged a settlement in which these four were to be paid.

At the end of 1999 the workers were still not being paid. Now it was nine of them who stood together and requested they be paid, their employer made arrangements to have the deported.

Since that time the others came together (about 100 of the 300) and have been designated as a legal "class" for the suit. Throughout this year they have been tageted for harrassment, suspended from work, at times kept in the compound, continually not paid, gone hungry with inadequate meals - for which they have been required to pay, even though their contract promised them food and housing. Theýve had their passports and ID cards taken away from them. Their families in Vietnam have been harrassed for having dissident daughters.

The company itself seems to be not functioning well, there was nothing for the women to sew for almost two months - during which time they were to stay in the compound and were not paid. They became increasingly bold and began to go out during the days looking for work. They need to send money home for their families to pay off the enormous debts incurred in getting them here, but they are not legally allowed to work except for their sponsor/employer. There are warnings in the paper about it being a violation of immigration law to help these women by allowing them to work.

A few weeks ago Daewoosa went back to "full time production" and all workers were to be sewing full time again. However, this lasted less than a week, the company seems to be rationing fabric to keep the women busy, but they are still laid off for afternoons from time to time - and out in the community looking for ođ-jobs.

The court is called on in this case to restore them their rights of freedom of speech, movement and association, to have them paid a fair and legal wage, to have the stated benefits of their contracts
fulfilled, to allow them due process before the Immigration Board, and to free them and their families from harrassment and discrimination for seeking these basic rights.

Very few of the women speak English, and none of them are near
proficient enough to communicate easily beyond basic exchanges. There was one woman who had not only the language skills, but also the courage to organize the women and take their case to the legal system. She died during a Sunday afternoon outing in which 30 women went to a local swimming areạ She and a friend were walking on a ledge well above the water when a huge, unexpected wave crashed and these two were thrown over the edge and dissappeared. There had been an earthquake near Fiji a short while before which could explain the unusal wave, and these two just happened to be near the water when it hit. The others, I have heard, were out of the water and away from the shore getting ready to leave or else many more would have been lost. There was no "foul play" involved in her death.

The hearing in Friday will be reviewing with the judge some printed contracts of employment for the women. The key testimony will come from the Korean speaking employer. There are many Korean people here who speak English well, and we had not anticipated a need for an
interpreter, however the past week left the case without any one willing to be involved in a case against the men of Daewoosạ We were making urgent arrangements to bring someone in from off-island, and at last someone agreed and is able to help.For this Friday the hearing is covered.

The trial in January is only two days (18 and 19), and we certainly will need to have someone able to interpret for these two days in the court. However I am concerned that if we do not continue to support and encourage these women, provide them with timely feedback about their situation and the progress of the case, and provide education on human rights and labor rights for them to really understand what they are entitled to that the harrassment and silence will take its toll, and they will lose hope in what they set out to accomplish. It is important not only that these women are provided justice, but American Samoa needs to learn for itself about human rights and labor. Our "distant to all" location had kept it free from these issues for a long time (unlike Saipan's situation), but as attention focuses in one part of the world the sweatshops will pack up and try to do their business elsewherẹ I have heard there are other garment factories trying to go into
operation herẹ If Daewoosa is handled well we may save this island from alot of suffering.

Ím excited to hear of all the interest. We will be following up to those who have offered leads and advicẹ We may need your help in the future if it becomes important to demonstrate to the local isolated legal system that eyes are on them and care about the decisions they makẹ

Thank You all very much.
Heather Margaret
Heather.Margaret@alumnaẹbrynmawr.edu



PACIFIC ISLANDS REPORT

VIETNAMESE WORKER LOSES EYE IN DAEWOOSA SAMOA MELEE

By Fili Sagapolutele

PAGO PAGO, American Samoa (November 29, 2000 - PIDP/CPIS)---Eleven Vietnamese workers were injured, including a woman who lost her left eye, after a melee erupted between Samoan and Vietnamese workers at the Daewoosa Samoa garment factory on Tuesdaỵ

And several Vietnamese workers, in a sworn statement to police, accused the companýs owner-president, Mr. Kil Soo Lee, of instigating the meleẹ

Police are not commenting on the case except to say that an investigation is under way and no arrests have been madẹ

Ms. Quyen, who lost her eye, has also been identified as being at the center of a disagreement with a Samoan supervisor that allegedly prompted the battle between the two groups.

Vietnamese workers claimed to have seen the supervisor, identified in affidavits as Mr. Nùuuli, get physically rough with Ms. Quyen, who has been described as "tiny" when standing next to her supervisor.

Vietnamese workers are claiming that they moved in towards Mr. Nùuuli in an effort to separate Ms. Quyen from him and to shield her from harm.

In immediate response to the group of Vietnamese workers allegedly rushing Mr. Nùuuli, many of the Samoan workers allegedly rushed the Vietnamese workers on the assumption that he was being attacked by the foreign workers.

After the situation quieted down, it was discovered that Ms. Quyen suffered a severe eye injurỵ Her left eyés corona and retina had been serious damaged. Later, medical personnel determined that the eye could not be saved and it was completely removed by surgerỵ

Ms. Quyen has since alleged that another Samoan worker struck her with "something" on the left side of her facẹ That "something" remains unidentified.

Daewoosa employee attorneys Virginia Sudbury and Christa Lin said that their clients now "are all terrified of going back to the Daewoosa factorỵ"

Sudbury described many of the Vietnamese workers as being hurt, with cuts and bruises. They were all treated and released from the hospital except for Ms. Quyen, who is still hospitalized.

"Christa and I are very upset over this case," Sudbury said.

She believes that this is just another example of Daewoosás continuing efforts to intimidate its foreign workers because of their class action suit against the companỵ

"We don't know if this was planned or who is at fault here but what we do know is that a number of workers have been assaulted, with one extremely badly hurt," she said.

"Christa and I hope that charges will be filed against anyone who caused these serious injuries to the Vietnamese workers," she continued.

Vietnamese workers normally are housed at Daewoosa Samoás dormitories but most of them now are staying with local families as a result of the incident.

Several Vietnamese workers in statements taken by police, with the help of a translator, accused Mr. Lee of instigating the meleẹ

According to the workers statements, Mr. Lee allegedly told his floor supervisor, Mr. Nùuuli, "to beat anybody that won't listen and that if anybody dies, I will be responsible for that."

In a notarized and typed statement filed in court, Daewoosa worker Hang Thu Ngo reported seeing his Samoan co-workers "armed with sticks and small scissors repeatedly stab and beat the Vietnamese workers" and also saw "many Vietnamese workers who were bleeding from the mouths and eyes."

Another worker, 28-year old Trinh Thi Hao, reported that "all the Samoan workers already have sticks. They are readỵ So as a result, Samoans came to beat us up. As I was standing up, watch, one of the Samoan workers pulled my hair out on the ground and hurt mẹ Then everybody else tried to pull me out. The people hit mẹ I remember their faces but I don't know their names. My chest is hurting bad now."

One 32-year-old Vietnamese worker said, "My friends and I came to prevent them from fighting. But I didn't know why there were many Samoan people rushing out with sticks in their hands to fight against Vietnamese workers. I came to my room to take my camera for taking photographs but Samoan people prevented me from it."

Daewoosa Samoás manager, Virginia Solìai, denied the allegations against Mr. Leẹ According to Solìai, the floor supervisor found two workers lying on a sewing table in the factorỵ The two workers said they were waiting for materials.

Solíai said when the floor supervisor informed them to go and pick up the materials, Ms. Quyen started yelling back at him but still would not return to work.

The floor supervisor complained to the Vietnamese manager about the problem but no attempts were made to correct it. The matter was then taken to Mr. Shung, the production manager.

Explaining the companýs policies, Solíai said anyone caught sitting around on the job or sleeping, whether he or she is Samoan or Vietnamese, is told to go homẹ

Mr. Shung ordered that the woman, or anyone else not working, to get out of the factory and go homẹ But as the floor supervisor was taking Miss Quyen's hand to lead her out of the factory, she allegedly threw the first punch and allegedly slapped the floor supervisor.

The ironing department workers saw the Vietnamese workers run towards the floor supervisor with "weapons" such as scissors and cutters to attack him.

Allegedly, this resulted in a laceration on the floor supervisor's facẹ

As recalled by Solìai, who was not in the area, the Samoans working in the packing department saw the attack on the floor supervisor, who was now on the floor, and "came fighting with their hands."

"These Samoans work in the packing department and they don't use any cutters or scissors. They used their hands to help defend the floor supervisor against the attack," Solìai explained.

Solìai said the Samoan workers do not use any sharp items in their working areas and believes it was the hands that caused the injuries.

Regarding the allegations that Mr. Lee ordered the beating, Solìai said Mr. Lee was not even in the vicinity when it happened. She said she and Mr. Lee were outside of the factory at the timẹ

Currently, Daewoosa has about 250 foreign workers and fewer than 50 local workers.

Daewoosa Samoa has been marred with financial problems, including not paying its foreign workers. The company also has been cited by the ỤS. Department of Labor for violating labor laws.

A meeting between representatives of the territorial government, Daewoosa Samoa and attorney for the Vietnamese workers is scheduled for sometime later this week.

A court order is pending that prohibits Daewoosa Samoa from deporting any Vietnamese workers without court approval or due process.


Tam Nguyen  
#2 Posted : Monday, December 4, 2000 4:26:43 AM(UTC)
Tam Nguyen

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/28/2011(UTC)
Posts: 23

Chào mọi nguời,

Hôm nay tôi có phone nói chuyện với bà Gwen Stroud là nguời phụ trách tổng quát việc điều tra các vụ vi phạm lao động của Bộ Lao Động. Bà ấy nói hãy gởi các documents, và thỉnh nguyện thư đi rồi bả sẽ tìm cách giúp đỡ. Tôi cũng đã gọi lên văn phòng bà Bộ truởng Lao động là bà Alexis M. Herman và cũng đã kiếm đuơc email ađress của bả , để chúng ta gởi email đến bả nhờ can thiệp cho dễ dàng và nhanh chóng ,tiện lợi hơn . Xin đồng huơng tiếp tục gởi thơ về email ađresses của hai vị này để chúng ta có thể hỗ trợ hiệu quả hơn cho những đồng bào khốn khổ của mình

Email ađresses of Ms. Gwen Stroud : Hotline@oig.dol.gov
BTLD Ms. Alexis Herman: Herman_Alexis@dol.gov

Tâm Nguyên

visitor  
#3 Posted : Monday, December 4, 2000 4:59:57 AM(UTC)
visitor

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 8/28/2011(UTC)
Posts: 8,887

Was thanked: 1 time(s) in 1 post(s)
Chỉ muốn nhắc bạn Tâm Nguyên, đây là mục giúp đỡ về kỹ thuật cho việc xử dụng VB forum. Đồng ý là TN rất có nhiệt tâm, nhưng TN cũng nên post ngắn gọn, những bài quá dài nên cho LINK cho đỡ tốn chổ của VB.
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